Ingenius upcycling

In my last blog post I wrote about learning so much from the participants in my classes – the show and tell sessions where I am privileged to be shown books that they have made since taking a book making workshop make sharing so worthwhile.

Living in the country miles from the nearest art supply store makes for very creative people and Erin who participated in my book making workshops in Narrogin recently had an abundance of computer parts she has found a new use for.

"Sewn on Tapes" book using computer parts  - Handmade by Erin Bailey - photo courtesy of Erin Bailey

“Sewn on Tapes” book using computer parts – Handmade by Erin Bailey – photo courtesy of Erin Bailey

Erin creates some wonderful steampunk jewellery, makes tin horses from some very interesting discarded items to promote  the “tin horse highway” and Kulin bush races.  You can find her page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/eBee-Creations/227915167353792.

 

It makes my heart sing – thank you so much for sharing Erin.

Advertisements

Retracing my steps

Yesterday I retraced my steps to ARtS Space, Narrogin for another book making workshop.  It rained most of the way there but it was not blowing the gale that was forecast thankfully.  Whenever I pack my little car for a workshop I am always on tenterhooks until I have everything laid out at the workshop venue in case I have forgotten anything.  Yesterday I forgot the aprons (we were using glue) and if anyone is going to mess up their clothes it would be me!  Luckily I was able to find some in the local supermarket – along with chocolate in case of concentration or frustration problems during the day.

I really enjoy teaching workshops and often am left pondering on just who learns more – the participants or myself.  Everyone comes up with a new take on what we are doing, arranges things differently, problem solves in an innovative way and produces a book that is wholly theirs.

I love seeing books that participants in previous workshops have made after that workshop – they never cease to delight me, and yesterday’s “show and tell” was no exception.

The trip home was so enjoyable – sunshine on the patchwork of paddocks between Narrogin and Williams showed up different shades of green depending on the growth stage of the crop interspersed with the odd paddock of brilliant yellow canola. Closer to Collie in the forest there was a carpet of wildflowers beneath the trees contrasting sharply with the rusty coffee rocks.  I found the rain on the other side of Collie so the last bit of the journey had to use the windscreen wipers – but home safely before dark – a lovely day.

Textile Artist Bobbie Bates and her eco printed books - made following the first workshop in Narrogin

Textile Artist Bobbie Bates and her eco printed books – made following the first workshop in Narrogin

Beautiful stitching on tapes - love the contrasting thread

Beautiful stitching on tapes – love the contrasting thread

Folding and cutting pages for the books

Folding and cutting pages for the books

More folding and cutting pages

More folding and cutting pages

Guerilla Art?

I love quirky ideas, the concept of “paying it forward” and using recycled materials.  A germ of an idea has been growing for a while to send out a little good karma into the area where I live.

Most of the journals I make are metric sizes where I fold and cut larger sheets of paper into smaller folios – as a result there is no wastage, occasionally though I do end up with odd sized sheets of paper on my bench.  I turn these into smaller books where I might practise different sewings.  One of my favourite notebooks is a Moleskine cahier notebook copy where the covers are old cardboard cereal boxes, and the demonstration books from my workshops soon grow in number.

I have now started packaging these books up with a little note explaining that they are gifts and include my business card. I was out and about in Busselton on Wednesday delivering my artist’s book for the Signature South West exhibition and left a few journals and notebooks around town.

On Thursday morning I had a phone call from a lady who had picked up one of the notebooks – she had a particularly trying morning and could not quite believe that it was a purely philanthropic gesture.  Her happiness and pleasure in such a small gesture and that she took the trouble to phone and thank me, has made my week and reinforced my will to carry on with this project.

If you are out and about in my little corner of the world – keep your eyes open – you may find your own little package.  It helps if you know my habits!!!!!!

Commissioned work

I really enjoy working on commissioned books, discussing what form the book will take and letting it evolve during the making is a pleasurable task. Over the past couple of weeks I have been reflecting on the life of a friend and neighbour who sadly lost his battle with that insidious disease, cancer, recently. I have been remembering fondly his generous nature, always welcoming people to his home, quick to help anyone in need. I never heard him say a bad thing about anyone. He was truly a gentle man. He will be remembered by his friends and family without any need for prompts, but his wife requested a book to hold tangible memories and written tributes. I tried to pay homage to his love of his bush home by using snippets of eco dyed fabrics and commercially printed cottons with australian native plants printed on them and added vintage crochet doily snippets and vintage buttons and lace because I knew it would be something his wife would appreciate. Nothing can ease the pain of losing someone so important, but I hope this will go a little way to show how much we appreciated knowing this special person.

Memory book for a special man

Memory book for a special man

More up-cycling

I have been having such fun this week making these fun books.

They are side bound books with orphaned teaspoons sourced from Ebay.  I love how they have turned out.  With so many budding master chefs around these days I thought they would be fun with kitchen/baking themed papers for the covers.

Here are just a couple of them – what do you think?

Cupcake book with vintage teaspoon spoon

Cupcake book with vintage teaspoon spoon

Kitchen/baking themed book with vintage jam spoon

Kitchen/baking themed book with vintage jam spoon

The tyranny (or not) of distance!

Yesterday, after wading through rivers of water during the storm at 5.30am to put our horses out into their paddock (they were most indignant at being woken at that hour and very reluctant to join me in wading!) I set off for a cross country drive to Narrogin in the heart of the West Australian wheat growing area.  Narrogin is a country town, some three hours drive from our capital city of Perth.  The drive was very pleasant, the weather being kind to me, there were only a few sprinkles of rain on the windscreen.  The paddocks are all looking green after recent rainfall.  I arrived in the town with plenty of time before the workshop started and was pleasantly surprised to find a coffee shop open at that time of day.  The coffee was good and the roaring fire was very welcoming.

It was easy to find the venue for the workshop in Narrogin’s main street.  The Artspace is a wonderfully welcoming, large space  and ideal to hold any workshop, also a great meeting place.  I understand ARtS Narrogin is run by volunteers and they are planning all sorts of exciting events – the Ten Sopranos will be performing in Narrogin on Wednesday – if you live in the area check out their FaceBook page at https://www.facebook.com/ARtSNarrogin.

I had a fabulous day teaching lots of simple book structures – using some recycled items, and shared lots more ideas.  Some of the workshop participants had travelled a considerable distance to attend and I think they all had a good time – they worked really hard and produced a considerable collection of books during the day.

Despite being a considerable distance from the capital city and having limited access to art supplies Narrogin has an artspace and organisation to be proud of, and lots of enthusiastic and very talented people.  I love rural Western Australia.

working hard in Artspace Narrogin

working hard in Artspace Narrogin

The fantastic work space at ARtS Narrogin

The fantastic work space at ARtS Narrogin

making mini books for necklaces

making mini books for necklaces

Siena, Italy

Siena was my favourite place in Italy.  I loved the walled city, the houses, palazzos, cobbled streets and the general pace of life.  The taxi ride from the train station to the hotel was a little confronting – pedestrians, cars, taxis and buses all compete for the narrow road space – the pedestrians keep walking, the cars keep driving and somehow everyone gets to where they are going – I can’t believe there are not endless accidents and minor bingles all the time. I think driving licences obtained here are well earned.

The hotel was near the Duomo and in a great position for walking the city. Just down the street from our hotel was an upholsterers workshop – every time we walked past he was working on a piece of furniture – so nice to see that the throw away age has not yet reached here.  A little further on was the studio of an amazing calligrapher – who also dabbled in book binding.  He has the most amazing presses and equipment in his studio but told me that he has little time to indulge in bookbinding.  His time is taken up with the creation and restoration of calligraphy pieces.  He generously allows the public to watch him work and to photograph anything in his studio and encourages questions.  I spent a wonderful half hour talking to him about his craft and he gave me four of his beautiful cards to bring home with me.

Almost opposite is the Bini bakery – glorious traditional pastries and the best panforte I have ever had – I had to eat it all whilst we were there for fear that it would not be allowed to be brought back into Australia (tongue in cheek)!!

Walking the various districts of the city was fun – each district has an animal emblem and these emblems are displayed in various forms – statues, fountains artwork on shops and in these tie up rings placed fairly high on the buildings – I must try and find out what their traditional use was.

Siena is on my list of places to spend more time in.

Bini - makers of beautiful pastries and panforte - the almonds all laid out ready for that evenings baking

Bini – makers of beautiful pastries and panforte – the almonds all laid out ready for that evenings baking

this district's emblem is the giraffe - tie up rings in rows on the buildings - well above head height

this district’s emblem is the giraffe – tie up rings in rows on the buildings – well above head height

The turtle was the emblem here - obviously rubbing the head is a regular practice!

The turtle was the emblem here – obviously rubbing the head is a regular practice!

Hand painted and hand written calligraphy - intricate and beautiful

Hand painted and hand written calligraphy – intricate and beautiful